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Wednesday, March 18
 

7:10am CDT

Shuttle Schedule, Sheraton (Confirm at hotel front desk)
- Please notify the Front Desk of your intended shuttle usage. Each trip takes approximately 20 minutes.
- If you need to arrange an alternate shuttle pick up with the Sheraton Midtown or miss the final scheduled shuttle, please call their Shuttle Service at 612-419-3976 (preferred) or the hotel directly at 612-821-7600.

Morning runs to Macalester College/Leonard Center on Wednesday (3/18):
Leaving the Sheraton at:  7:10, 7:30, 7:50 & 8:10 a.m.
 
Morning runs to Macalester College/Leonard Center on Thursday (3/19):
Leaving the Sheraton at: 7:30, 8:00 & 8:15 a.m.

Afternoon runs to the Sheraton from Macalester College/Leonard Center on Wednesday (3/18):
Leaving Macalester at 4:00, 4:30 and 4:45 p.m.
 
Afternoon runs to the Sheraton from Macalester College/Leonard Center on Thursday (3/19):
Leaving Macalester at 3:45, 4:15 and 4:45 p.m.

If you need to arrange an alternate shuttle pick up with the Sheraton Midtown or miss the final scheduled shuttle, please call their Shuttle Service at 612-419-3976 (preferred) or the hotel directly at 612-821-7600.

Wednesday March 18, 2020 7:10am - 4:45pm CDT

7:15am CDT

Hotel Shuttle Schedule, DoubleTree (Confirm at hotel front desk)
- Please notify the Front Desk of your intended shuttle usage. Each trip takes approximately 20 minutes.
- If you need to arrange an alternate shuttle pick up with the DoubleTree by Hilton Roseville or miss the final scheduled shuttle, please call their Front Desk at 651-636-4567. 

Morning runs to Macalester College/Leonard Center on Wednesday (3/18):
Leaving the DoubleTree by Hilton Roseville at: 7:15 & 8:00 a.m.

Morning runs to Macalester College/Leonard Center on Thursday (3/19):
Leaving the DoubleTree by HIlton Roseville at: 7:30 & 8:15 a.m.

Afternoon runs to the DoubleTree by Hilton Roseville on Wednesday (3/18):
Leaving Macalester/Leonard Center at 4:00 & 4:45 p.m.

Afternoon runs to the DoubleTree by Hilton Roseville on Thursday (3/19):
Leaving Macalester.Leonard Center at 4:00 & 4:45 p.m.

Game Night on Wednesday, 3/18 (please confirm shuttle at the Front Desk)
Leave DoubleTree by Hilton Roseville for Sheraton Midtown at 6:30 p.m.
Leave Sheraton Midtown for DoubleTree by Hilton Roseville at 9:30 p.m.

Wednesday March 18, 2020 7:15am - 9:30pm CDT

7:30am CDT

Registration/ Hot Breakfast
Registration table will be in the Atrium on the 2nd floor of the Leonard Center. Hot breakfast will be in the adjacent Field House.

Wednesday March 18, 2020 7:30am - 9:00am CDT
LC - Field House

9:00am CDT

Keynote - April Hathcock
April M. Hathcock works internationally at the intersection of libraries, scholarly communication, law, and social justice. She is currently the Director of Scholarly Communications and Information Policy at New York University where she educates the campus community on issues of ownership, access, and rights in the research lifecycle. Hathcock received her J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Duke University School of Law and her M.L.I.S. from the University of South Florida. Before entering librarianship, she practiced intellectual property and antitrust law for a global private firm. Her research interests include diversity and inclusion in librarianship, cultural creation and exchange, and the ways in which social and legal infrastructures benefit the works of certain groups over others. She is a 2018 Library Journal Mover and Shaker, as well as the author of the article “White Librarianship in Blackface: Diversity Initiatives in LIS” and the blog At the Intersection, which examines issues at the intersection of feminism, libraries, social justice, and the law.

Speakers
avatar for April Hathcock

April Hathcock

Director of Scholarly Communications & Information Policy, NYU
April Hathcock is the Scholarly Communications Librarian at NYU where she educates the campus community on issues of ownership, access, and rights in the research lifecycle. She received her J.D. and LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from Duke University School of Law and... Read More →


Wednesday March 18, 2020 9:00am - 10:15am CDT
LC - Field House

10:30am CDT

Foyer: Super-Simple Signage with Wordpress
Foyer, a free WordPress plug-in that allows you to display slides and videos on your site, is a "set it and forget it" solution for library digital signage. This session will show you how to install a LAMP stack and WordPress or, alternatively, let Reclaim Hosting do it for you for a small fee. Then we’ll cover installing, configuring and beginning to use the plug-in. We’ll talk about some policies and best practices that will keep your signage system attractive and easy to manage month after month, we'll discuss the challenges of building confidence among staff interested in creating slides but hesitant to do so, and you’ll create, upload and send some greetings from LibTech to the Wallace Library at Wheaton College (MA)’s foyer in real-time.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas San Filippo

Thomas San Filippo

Systems & Educational Technology Liaison, Wheaton College (MA)


Wednesday March 18, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Olin-Rice 100

10:30am CDT

Getting it Right on Rights Redux: Implementing RightsStatements.org
In 2017 the Minnesota Digital Library (MDL) and the University of Minnesota Library staff presented at Lib Tech on the emerging standards for rights and digital content: RightsStatements.org.  The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) introduced and launched RightsStatements.org in 2016. The 2017 LIbTech session provided an introduction to this new standard and shared ideas on how it might be implemented locally. . For 2020, we would like to provide an update on that session, and offer “Getting it Right on Rights Redux.”  

Speakers
avatar for Greta Bahnemann

Greta Bahnemann

Metadata Librarian, University of Minnesota
Greta Bahnemann is the Metadata Librarian for the Minnesota Digital Library, a position she has held since 2010. At the Minnesota Digital Library, Greta is responsible for implementing current metadata standards and best practices for the Minnesota Digital Library's primary project... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Sims

Nancy Sims

Copyright Program Librarian, University of Minnesota
Nancy Sims is lawyerbrarian who is fascinated by copyright issues in modern life. She helps folks understand how copyright may affect their lives, and advocates policies and laws that enable wide public cultural participation.
avatar for Sara Ring

Sara Ring

Continuing Education Librarian, Minitex
Sara Ring is Continuing Education Librarian at Minitex in the Digital Initiatives & Metadata Education unit. She develops and presents training on linked data and metadata standards for digital collections and digital preservation. She holds an M.A. in Library and Information Studies... Read More →
avatar for Molly Huber

Molly Huber

Minnesota Digital Library Outreach Coordinator, Minitex
Molly Huber joined the Minnesota Digital Library (MDL) in 2014, having previously worked at the Minnesota Historical Society and the Minneapolis Institute of Art. She holds a B.A from the University of Massachusetts and an M.A from the University of South Carolina. As MDL's Outreach... Read More →


Wednesday March 18, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Library Harmon Room

10:30am CDT

Here's What Python Does for Us: What Can it Do for Your Library?
Programming with Python can alleviate the burden of routine, time-consuming tasks for library workers. In this session, attendees will learn how Python is being used at NC State University Libraries to query GOBI and produce automated monthly reports for the Collections & Research Strategy department. GOBI, our print and ebook ordering vendor platform, does not offer an API, so reports used to be compiled through manual title-by-title searching. What used to take up to 15 hours per month (and was the cause of much frustration) now takes just 30 minutes and one press of a “run” button, all thanks to Python’s diverse set of libraries and abilities. Following a presentation of this script and how it was developed, attendees will learn methods for identifying the right Python packages and methodologies for their unique needs and project ideas, even if they are new to programming.

Speakers
avatar for Katharine Frazier

Katharine Frazier

North Carolina State University
Interested in tech tools, programming languages, data analysis, and collections.


Wednesday March 18, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

10:30am CDT

Libraries Support for Course Integrated Sustainability Student Media Projects: One Year Later
This presentation will provide a one year follow up highlighting my UMN Institute on the Environment Educators research project (Sustainability Student Produced Media Project Gallery - Https://z.umn.edu/sustainabilitymediaprojects). This gallery of real-world sustainability-related media projects supported by the UMN Libraries Media Services program over the years is designed to inspire K-12 teachers/higher education instructors to consider adopting this pedagogical approach by illustrating the benefits (and limitations) of different types of student produced media projects that foster deeper subject knowledge and library research on sustainability related topics, while aiding in the student development of digital media technical production, critical thinking, public engagement, and media literacy skill sets, that are necessary to traverse our current complex information ecosystem.

Speakers
SS

Scott Spicer

Media Outreach and Learning Spaces Librarian, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities)
I serve as Media Outreach and Learning Spaces Librarian for the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Libraries. In this role, I am head of Media Services, a program dedicated to supporting the development of student media literacy skill sets, and promotion of deeper subject knowledge... Read More →


Wednesday March 18, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Library 250

10:30am CDT

Who are These People and Why are They in My Library? Using Empathy and UX to Understand your Library Patrons
How often does your library make decisions about services offered without checking with library users first? Are library administrators or external agents making decisions on behalf of library patrons without understanding their needs? Are you puzzling over why some of your programs are poorly attended, or services under utilized? Do you sometimes feel like you are floundering in the dark, trying to make sense of patron behavior? Have you done usability testing, but need to go beyond that to learn even easier methods for assessing and improving library services? In this session we will discuss ways to know your users better through some powerful UX techniques like: creating user personas, diagramming user journey maps, conducting focus groups and surveys, field studies, and card sorting. This session, conducted by a librarian at a university and a UX professional from the private sector, will include hands on demonstrations and group work showcasing both qualitative and quantitative UX methods. Attendees will leave with ready models to put to work in their library.

Speakers
avatar for Rich Harrison

Rich Harrison

User Experience Consultant, Horizontal (at U.S. Bank)
avatar for Jennifer DeJonghe

Jennifer DeJonghe

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Metropolitan State University


Wednesday March 18, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Weyerhaeurser Boardroom

10:30am CDT

Wi-Fi to Go: Starting a Mobile Hotspot Lending Program
Many public libraries have added mobile wi-fi hotspots to their circulating collections. Hotspot lending is a natural fit for public libraries because of their emphasis on equal access to information and bridging the digital divide. But what should you consider before you start a hotspot lending program at your library? If you’ve ever thought about starting a hotspot lending program, this session is for you. This panel presentation will provide insight into planning, establishing, and maintaining these unique programs. The audience will benefit from considerations on policy creation, device selection, and marketing that panelists wish they had known before implementing their hotspot lending programs. Attendees are encouraged to ask questions about establishing library hotspot lending programs ranging from practical to philosophical.

Speakers
avatar for Carissa Hansen

Carissa Hansen

Library Director, West Fargo Public Library
JD

Jason DeShaw

Fargo Public Library


Wednesday March 18, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Olin-Rice 250

11:30am CDT

Lunch (Taco bar)
Wednesday March 18, 2020 11:30am - 1:00pm CDT
LC - Field House

1:00pm CDT

Digital Preservation Workflow with AWS
The Digital Collections of the Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge makes almost 64,000 objects available to the public through over 30 collections in OCLC’s ContentDM, with new collections being received, processed and curated each month. Storage overhead for archival files had grown to over 10TB, stored locally, which made backups untenable and local storage failure inevitable. In Fall 2018 we began architecting a solution for inexpensive permanent storage with secure preservation using Amazon Web Services (AWS) S3 Glacier. The session will demonstrate how the Oviatt Library integrated Glacier and other AWS services into our networked environment, and implemented an inexpensive archive/restore tool, Cloudberry, so that staff could readily retrieve archived items from deep storage without disturbing their integrity. The project was fully implemented November 2020.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Altman

Elizabeth Altman

Web Services Coordinator, California State University, Northridge
avatar for Justin Kovalcik

Justin Kovalcik

Director of Library IT, California State University, Northridge Oviatt Library


Wednesday March 18, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Olin-Rice 350

1:00pm CDT

Establishing Governance for Project and Service Management
Recently, the Carnegie Mellon University Libraries began to implement a new strategic plan, which greatly increased the number, complexity, and scope of new projects and services sponsored by the Libraries. Historically, initiation, planning, and management of projects and services within Libraries lacked both codified processes and uniform management tools. Libraries’ leadership quickly realized that the rapid increase in the size of the unit’s project and service footprints had rendered such an unstructured approach to project and service management untenable. In response to leadership’s concerns, the Libraries’ Digital Strategy team launched an effort to establish a structure of governance around project and service management within the University Libraries. This talk will review the selection process for new project and service portfolio management tools, as well as the effort to define project initiation and management and service transition guidelines, with the intent of providing a framework for establishing project and service management governance in similar organizations.

Speakers
JG

Jason Glenn

Carnegie Mellon University


Wednesday March 18, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Library Harmon Room

1:00pm CDT

Help! They Think I Can Support Text Analysis Projects: Getting Started with Text Analysis for Librarians Without a Budget
As more and more researchers embrace digital methodologies, librarians are being called upon to support new types of research projects. One such increasingly common research method is digital textual analysis, sometimes called “Distant Reading.” While these new methodologies may feel very unfamiliar, librarians are actually already equipped with many of the necessary skills and strategies for this realm. Building on these, we will start by exploring some of the fundamental concepts and methodologies of text analysis. Together, we will create a collection of textual material to analyze. Then we will do some basic text manipulation and create visualizations from our corpus. Participants will leave with easy, actionable steps to bring back to their own researchers, no budget needed. BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) if possible -- we will provide a limited number of devices for participants to use during this interactive session.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Calhoun

Sarah Calhoun

Humanities & Digital Scholarship Librarian, Carleton College
avatar for Iris Jastram

Iris Jastram

Reference & Instruction Librarian, Carleton College


Wednesday March 18, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Olin-Rice 100

1:00pm CDT

Inclusive Library Services: The Basics
Learn how South Carolina Talking Book Services and the South Carolina State Library have teamed up to promote inclusive and accessible library services. In 2015, South Carolina Talking Book Services developed an Assistive Technology Petting Zoo containing assistive devices for the blind and visually impaired. It is transported around the state to educate the public and library staff. The State Library continued investing in inclusive services by adding an Inclusive Services Consultant to its Library Development team in 2017 to support South Carolina’s 42 public library systems. In 2016, eleven SC public library systems added assistive technology through LSTA sub-grants administered by the State Library. Soon afterward, the Inclusive Services Center was established to promote diverse library materials and assistive technology.
Drawing on these experiences, we will discuss how assistive technology expands the reach of existing services and collections to patrons previously unable to enjoy them due to barriers inherent in their original format. The technology we will discuss includes magnification, text-to-speech, braille conversion, mass-market assistive listening devices, and the various free options offered by NLS-sponsored libraries for the blind and print disabled. Finally, we will provide best practices for libraries interested in expanding access to assistive technology for their patrons.

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Smith

Caroline Smith

Inclusive Services Consultant, South Carolina State Library
avatar for Kristin White

Kristin White

State Director, South Carolina State Library: Talking Book Services
Kristin White is the Director of Talking Books Services for the South Carolina State Library. She received her B.A. in History with a minor in Speech from Georgia State University and her M.L.I.S. from Valdosta State University. Having over 25 years of experience in libraries and... Read More →



Wednesday March 18, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

1:00pm CDT

Moving off ILLiad: Our Journey to Provide a Better User Experience While Sustaining University Resources
Are you on the Ex Libris ALMA library system but also utilizing a third party software for doing interlibrary loan? If you could save thousands of dollars and put in about the same amount of time for interlibrary loan processes while giving your users a better experience would you consider dropping ILLiad? This past year, Concordia University in St. Paul, Minnesota, a school with around 5,000 undergraduate and graduate students, switched from using ILLiad software for InterLibrary Loan requests and instead took advantage of Resource Sharing in Ex Libris ALMA. Our driving motivators for this effort were 1) the positive impact on our users and 2) the unsustainable use of university resources.This presentation will discuss the process we went through to make a lasting impact on our users. It will include valuable details for others who might be interested in pulling this off as well.

Speakers
avatar for Netanya Roden

Netanya Roden

Access Services Coordinator, Concordia University, St. Paul
I am a jigsaw puzzle enthusiast.
NR

Nathan Rinne

Cataloging, Reference, and Instruction Librarian, Concordia University, St. Paul


Wednesday March 18, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Olin-Rice 150

1:00pm CDT

Providing an Environment for Authentic Learning experiences by Serving as "Client" for Computer Science Capstone Projects
Loyola Notre Dame Library recently began partnering with the computer science department on senior capstone projects. By providing ready to go ideas and library-provided makerspace equipment, the library serves as client to students working through all phases of their projects: user requirements solicitation, design, implementation, and ultimately launch. This program has been a positive experience for all involved: the students gained valuable experience working through software design methodology and creating software in response to a real-world problem, the department gained a project with which to encourage hands-on learning, and the library acquired technology that could be implemented for assessment purposes. In the spring of 2018, a student developed a dry-erase board usage recording system using a fast vibration sensor, a Raspberry Pi, and a MySQL database. In the spring of 2020, the library served as client for two teams of two students. One team expanded the dry erase board usage system to include a low battery sensor and beacon technology to geolocate boards. A second team developed a meeting room occupancy system that could provide real time data on which rooms are available.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Treskon

Matthew Treskon

Technology Librarian, Loyola Notre Dame Library
Provides strategic vision and leadership of library technology operations and initiatives to support faculty and students.


Wednesday March 18, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Library 250

1:00pm CDT

Putting It Together: Escape Room Activities for Outreach and Instruction in Every Library
In this interactive session, attendees will work in small groups to complete an escape room activity! Librarians at the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) developed escape room activities for outreach and instruction. The activities challenged students to work together to solve puzzles before TIME RAN OUT. Inspired by escape room activities at public and academic libraries, our goal for these escape rooms was to offer students an opportunity to engage with the library and information literacy in a new way. Attendees will learn about the digital and analog tools UMD librarians used to create and implement escape room activities, learn tips and tricks from the creation process, and work together to reflect on how they can create escape room activities at their own libraries. Beginning and experienced puzzle-solvers are welcome!

Speakers
KJ

Kayleen Jones

University of Minnesota Duluth
IM

Ian Moore

Humanities & Fine Arts Librarian, University of Minnesota Duluth


Wednesday March 18, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Weyerhaeurser Boardroom

1:00pm CDT

Uniting Public and Academic Library Services: The Many Facets of CloudLibrary
In 2020, Metropolitan State University Library (MN) partnered with library technology solutions provider bibliotheca to test drive new features of their cloudLibrary smartphone app.Creating a more engaging experience for your library users, cloudLibrary helps physical and digital borrowers stay organized with a convenient virtual library card.Discover how modern technology we all have in our pockets and a simple, easy to use app can strengthen academic + public library services and create a better overall library experience for Saint Paul Public Library and Metro Library users. This session will cover Saint Paul Public Library’s staff and patron experiences with cloudLibrary, Metro Library’s outcomes and initial thoughts on the mobile checkout feature and overall experience partnering with bibliotheca and the cloudLibrary team. Presenters will also provide a live demo of the cloudLibrary app.

Speakers
avatar for John  Larson

John Larson

Digital Library Coordinator, Saint Paul Public Library
John Larson is the Digital Library Coordinator for the Saint Paul Public Library.He manages BiblioCore, BiblioEvents, and BiblioWeb for the library, trains staff on digital services, and works closely with the library’s marketing and communications department on the library’s... Read More →
avatar for Becca  Peters

Becca Peters

Cataloging and Acquisitions Librarian, Metropolitan State University
LG

Linette Greske

bibliotecha


Wednesday March 18, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Olin-Rice 250

2:15pm CDT

Artificial Intelligence and Oral Histories
In 2020 PALS helped staff at Augsburg University build a site for their ongoing oral history projects. The site, Augorah, was created so that Augsburg students, staff, and others could easily contribute recordings, transcripts, and the required consent forms. For this project, the staff at Augsburg were able to overcome a significant barrier to encouraging faculty, students, and staff to pursue oral histories in teaching and research. This barrier is a familiar one - the amount of time and effort it can take to create an accurate transcript of an interview. The solution that worked for this project was otter.ai, a transcription generator that uses artificial intelligence. Otter.ai generates text from a recording, and, importantly, it allows a user to edit the generated document, teach the system to recognize a speaker by their voice, and export a finished transcript in a variety of file formats. It also creates keywords out of commonly used terms.

This presentation will show you how Augorah was built to support user-contributed content and how otter.ai works for transcriptions. Learning objectives will be:
• Learn how a digital repository site can be set up to support user-contributed content
• Learn how otter.ai can save significant time and effort in the creation of oral histories
Speakers for the presentation will be Alex Kent, Digital Initiatives Librarian for PALS (www.mnpals.org), and Stewart Van Cleve, Digital Archives and Research Services Librarian for Augsburg University (archives.augsburg.edu).

Speakers
avatar for Stewart Van Cleeve

Stewart Van Cleeve

Digital Archives and Research Services Librarian, Augsburg University


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Olin-Rice 250

2:15pm CDT

Basic Web Coding for Librarians: HTML, CSS, and Javascript for LibGuides and so Much More
So much about our users’ experience of our libraries is mediated by the web. Having a little bit of experience with simple web coding can give you far more control over that user experience, and it can simplify your own workflows dramatically. Want to make a callout box in a block of text on a Libguide? Wish you could nudge that picture on a web page over to the left by a millimeter or two? Want to have a toggle button in a webform like LibAnalytics that makes other fields appear or disappear? All this and more can be accomplished with a little bit of basic web coding knowledge. In this session you’ll see some simple customizations that one librarian made with no formal training in web coding, and you’ll get to practice with actual code to make the web magic happen. We’ll also spend some time in live SpringShare products as an example of using the “custom CSS/JS” options that are available in many web applications. And of course, we’ll discuss strategies for taking this basic knowledge and building on it as needed using free online tools. You’ll leave with some basic tools (including a reminder template), skills, and strategies for your next web coding adventure. No prior experience necessary! Bring a laptop if possible -- there will be a limited number of shareable devices available for hands on coding -- but you’ll be able to follow along without a laptop if necessary.

Speakers
avatar for Iris Jastram

Iris Jastram

Reference & Instruction Librarian, Carleton College


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Olin-Rice 100

2:15pm CDT

Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software for Academic Libraries
Surveys are the most common type of research methodology in library literature; however, surveys don’t often gather the depth of information needed to make impactful change at our libraries. Some of the most revealing information librarians receive comes from the thoughts, perspectives, and experiences of our users. Over the past year, research & instruction librarians at the University of St. Thomas have conducted action research projects to collect this qualitative data to improve library instruction and services. The data analysis required in these projects was made possible with the help of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS, pronounced like that pointy green plant found in the desert). Using NVivo, one of the most popular CAQDAS tools, we have completed and are continuing to work on analysis projects with data from course syllabi, interviews with faculty about information literacy, student research diaries, and more. During this session we will discuss the benefits of using a product like NVivo, our experiences with it in past and current projects, as well as outline our efforts to build support for NVivo users. Alternatives to NVivo will also be presented. See how using software like this can improve your projects and benefit library users.

Speakers
avatar for Trent Brager

Trent Brager

Education and Social Sciences Librarian, University of St. Thomas
avatar for John Heintz

John Heintz

Data Services Librarian, University of St. Thomas


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Olin-Rice 150

2:15pm CDT

Creating Accessible Materials for Library Instruction
Instruction librarians are often limited to a single one-shot information literacy session for each class they work with. Librarians can expand the impact of their instruction outside of these short workshops by providing students with access to their presentation slides, worksheets, and other supplemental materials after a session. These instructional materials should be designed with accessibility in mind to ensure that they are useful for a diverse group of learners. This presentation will provide attendees with information about why accessibility of instructional materials is important, best practices for creating accessible documents, and freely available tools for accessibility testing. It will include information about choosing an appropriate file format as well as considerations for making common file formats more accessible (MS Word documents, PowerPoint presentations, etc.). While the presenter works in an academic library at a public university, this presentation is suitable for librarians, library staff, and LIS students who work in a variety of library contexts. Anyone who teaches, is interested in teaching, or wants to learn more about creating accessible presentations, documents, and other media will find something useful from this presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth White

Elisabeth White

Science, Technology, and Mathematics Librarian, Towson University


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

2:15pm CDT

Identity and Impostor Syndrome in Library Makerspaces
Do makerspaces belong in libraries? Are librarians makers? As makerspaces become more prevalent in libraries, many librarians are questioning their role in the community of tinkerers and creators known as the "Maker Movement."

Gender imbalance and a lack of diversity in makerspaces can lead to impostor syndrome, or “a false and sometimes crippling belief that one's successes are the product of luck or fraud rather than skill” (Merriam Webster). Impostor syndrome can affect anyone, but studies suggest that women and people of color are more likely to experience these feelings of inadequacy.

This session will share the findings of one librarian’s examination of her impostor syndrome and consider factors that can contribute to self-doubt in library makerspaces. She will share the results of conversations and interviews with her peers, as well as strategies for managing impostor syndrome. Participants will then take time to reflect on a time when they felt out of place or unsure of themselves. Attendees will be broken into small groups for discussion and to share their own approaches for conquering impostor syndrome.

Speakers
LN

Leanne Nay

Digital Engagement Librarian, Indiana University
Leanne Nay is the Digital Engagement Librarian for the Indiana University Libraries in Bloomington, Indiana. Her research interests include filmmaking, digital media, graphic design, makerspaces, and wearable technology. Prior to joining the IU Libraries, she worked as the Digital... Read More →


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Weyerhaeurser Boardroom

2:15pm CDT

Interactive SVG Library Maps
The University Library building is somewhat complex in structure because it is basically a newer 3-floors construction attached to the original 8-floor library building. Students easily get confused or lost when they are new to the library. The library maps were an interactive 3D building structure in Adobe Flash plus floor plans in PDF format. The librarians use these maps to give directions or demonstrate the building structure in their instructions or reference sessions. But as Adobe Flash is not supported on iOS devices and is blocked by some browsers, when the library website was redesigned, we had to find a new technology or format to replace the existing maps and fulfill the similar functions. In the map project, the original building floor plans were used as the source, so the new library maps accurately reflected the building layout. We selected the open source tool Inkscape to develop maps in the format of SVG, a vector-based graphics in XML. The new maps are easy to style, light-weighted, interactive, and accessible. Additionally, an interactive 2D building structure was used to show the location of each floor and to switch between floors. We are also planning usability tests for the maps and will implement feedback from users to improve the user experience of the maps.

Speakers
avatar for Jingjing Wu

Jingjing Wu

Web Assistant Librarian, Texas Tech University
Jingjing Wu is the Web assistant librarian in the Texas Tech University Libraries. She earned her Master of Science in Library and Information Science from Wayne State University and Bachelor of Engineering in Optical Instrumentation with a minor in Information Science from Zhejiang... Read More →


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Leonard Center Hall of Fame Room

2:15pm CDT

Let's Talk It Out: Senior Tech Training Through Talking Circles
Improve the reach and effectiveness of your patron technology training through talking circles. Class-focused tech training is space and resource intensive, and one-on-one training takes a lot of time; however, talking circles are a good way to create social bonds and create exciting new avenues to educate your patrons while using the fewest resources.

Speakers
avatar for Jake Fejedelem

Jake Fejedelem

Renville County Libraries - Pioneerland Library System


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Library Harmon Room

2:15pm CDT

Using Chrome-based Devices as Patron Computer Stations in Public Libraries
Thinking of diving into the use of Chrome-based devices as your patron computer stations or combining them with PC or Mac devices but not sure how to proceed?  Austin (MN) Public Library migrated from providing primarily PC-based computer stations for patrons in our library, to providing primarily Chrome-based device computer stations.  Chrome-based devices are affordable, fast, and easy to keep updated.  They have surpassed other devices used by students in K-12 education.  This session will share our two-year journey thus far and what we encountered, from purchasing the devices and setting up Google Admin for managing them, to print and session management, addressing patron concerns and connecting with other libraries nation-wide that are also using Chrome-based devices for patrons in their libraries.  Chrome-based devices can also be used for displays, reservation and print stations, circulation stations, catalog kiosks, circulating laptops, staff stations and more!

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Mulrooney

Patrick Mulrooney

Librarian, Austin (MN) Public Library


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Library 250

2:15pm CDT

Wiki-what? Wikidata for Library Staff
Wikidata, an editable knowledgebase for structured data, is growing in importance to the library community. The 2018 OCLC International Survey of Linked Data for Implementers shows a surge of library linked data projects that consumed Wikidata from 2011 to 2018. So, how are libraries using Wikidata, and what are the benefits? How can your organization participate? Attend this session to hear more about the library projects using Wikidata to enhance user discovery. You will also learn more about the basics of editing and enhancing items in Wikidata, and presenters and attendees can discuss possible future collaborative projects.

Speakers
avatar for Lizzy Baus

Lizzy Baus

Cataloging & Metadata Education Librarian, Minitex
Lizzy Baus is the Cataloging & Metadata Education Librarian for Minitex. She provides training for library staff on cataloging and other related topics, including RDA, BIBFRAME, and Linked Data.
avatar for Sara Ring

Sara Ring

Continuing Education Librarian, Minitex
Sara Ring is Continuing Education Librarian at Minitex in the Digital Initiatives & Metadata Education unit. She develops and presents training on linked data and metadata standards for digital collections and digital preservation. She holds an M.A. in Library and Information Studies... Read More →


Wednesday March 18, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Olin-Rice 350

3:30pm CDT

Automating Virtual Student Library Cards
This session will describe how Scott County Library and Shakopee Public Schools collaborated to automate virtual student library card creation in Shakopee, MN. Participants will learn how to: 1. Plan, partner, and collaborate with project stakeholders, including the Library, school district administrators, and technology departments. 2. Deploy technical process for automating student library card creation in a SirsiDynix Symphony system. Code discussed is open source and freely available on GitHub. 3. Educate the school community about to use this new resource. 

Speakers
avatar for Kristy Rieger

Kristy Rieger

Library Technology Manager, Scott County Library
Focused on providing the best user experience possible for customers. I have experience with school libraries and public libraries.
avatar for Sandra Reishus

Sandra Reishus

6-12 Media Specialist / Innovation Hub Coordinator, Shakopee Public Schools ISD 720
NS

Nathaniel Strauss

Shakopee Public Schools ISD 720


Wednesday March 18, 2020 3:30pm - 4:30pm CDT
Library Harmon Room

3:30pm CDT

Developing a Visualization Lab
The Chester Fritz Library recently installed a Virtual Reality/Artificial Intelligence (VR/AI) Lab as part of their building remodel in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Computational Research Center. The VR/AI Lab includes resources for data visualization, virtual and augmented reality, autonomous systems, 3D capture and content development. This session will be of interest to others who want to create a visualization lab or expand their offerings. It will address how the VR/AI Lab came to be at the library, design of the VR/AI Lab, components of the lab, and uses of the lab, as well as how librarians are using the lab to create opportunities with campus departments. Attendees will also have a chance to brainstorm how they or their campus might use a visualization lab.

Speakers
LE

Laura Egan

University of North Dakota
avatar for Heather Rogers

Heather Rogers

Education & Human Development Librarian, University of North Dakota


Wednesday March 18, 2020 3:30pm - 4:30pm CDT
Olin-Rice 250

3:30pm CDT

Digital Media Lab: Crafting Spaces to Support Innovation
As technology permeates learning and instruction, academic libraries have an opportunity to reimagine services to meet the needs of their communities in novel and meaningful ways. In this session, you will learn how our library conceived and implemented a digital media lab after determining that our campus lacked spaces and support for students and faculty to create digital content outside of the classroom setting. The digital media lab is supported by a dedicated staff member, open to the entire campus community, and situated around sound-isolating booths designed for recording and editing. The service model encourages our community to become comfortable learning new technologies, to master the use of communication tools, and to be proficient communicators in an interconnected world. In this session we will discuss the development of the space and its service model, the myriad possibilities for utilizing the equipment, and our work with campus partners in the planning and implementation phases of this project.

Speakers
avatar for Cara Barker

Cara Barker

Assistant Professor, Research & Instruction Librarian, Western Carolina University
Cara is the liaison for the Fine & Performing Arts, Psychology, Communication, and World Languages departments and serves as the citation management coordinator at Western Carolina University. She has a B.S. in Film & Television from Boston University and an MLIS from the University... Read More →
avatar for Scottie Kapel

Scottie Kapel

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Western Carolina University


Wednesday March 18, 2020 3:30pm - 4:30pm CDT
Weyerhaeurser Boardroom

3:30pm CDT

Holistic Embedded Librarianship Using LTIs
Embeddedness offers librarians the opportunity to extend the role of the library liaison. While embeddedness in librarianship is not a new idea, Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI) standards have improved the tools librarians can use to embed in courses. Through learning managements systems (LMS), librarians can utilize LTIs as they interact with students and instructors. Librarians who strive to be holistic liaisons can incorporate LTIs in order to support learning at the point of need.
This presentation will highlight the ways an Electronic Resources Librarian and a Digital Learning Librarian are embedding in college-level courses in order to collaborate more effectively with instructors and instructional designers. The presenters will show how they embed in learning management systems and leverage LTIs in order to facilitate active learning. The presenters will also show how LTIs can generate awareness of library resources, drive use of electronic resources, and create efficiencies and relationships with instructional designers. Throughout the presentation, presenters will explore new opportunities for assessment and understanding the use of library resources, advocacy to vendors to develop LTIs, copyright compliance and licensing. Attendees will leave the session with methods to use LTI tools to promote and extend the library’s services, and they will be able to explain the benefits of using LTIs and the role of the embedded librarian in an LMS.

Speakers
RB

Roxanne Backowski

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
LL

Liliana LaValle

University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire


Wednesday March 18, 2020 3:30pm - 4:30pm CDT
Olin-Rice 100

3:30pm CDT

Moving Towards More Sustainable Workflows for Digital Projects
Macalester College is one of many institutions seeing an increase in demand for the support of digital scholarly and curricular projects. This activity is, in part, attributable to grant-funded digital initiatives, such as the Digital Liberal Arts program funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. These grants provide incredible opportunities to develop new materials, but project managers and collaborators face the inevitable challenge of maintaining (or not) their work beyond the duration of the grant. In addition, these types of projects often have multiple stakeholders.

While the DLA initiative at Macalester funds a postdoctoral fellow for the full length of the grant, it also requires the energy and expertise of librarians and academic information associates. In an effort to form a more sustainable infrastructure of support for digital projects, and one that carefully considers the time invested by collaborators, the Digital Liberal Arts working group is endeavoring to create a replicable workflow. In this session, the DLA postdoctoral fellow, librarians and AIAs from Macalester will host a conversation about elements of a project workflow (from project scope through to stewardship), asking attendees to provide their own feedback on experiences with different phases of development. The Macalester DLA group is in the process of creating a living document offering suggestions on workflow and linking to resources from other institutions. It is by no means a complete or comprehensive document, but an ongoing effort to increase transparency and support for collaborators.

Speakers
AQ

Aisling Quigley

Postdoctoral Fellow in the Digital Liberal Arts, Macalester College
avatar for Ginny Moran

Ginny Moran

Research & Instruction Librarian, Macalester College
Ginny Moran has been the ARLD Legislative Liaison since August 2017, and has had an interest in legislative policy for most of her professional career.
avatar for Louann  Terveer

Louann Terveer

Digital Initiatives & Scholarly Communication Librarian, Macalester College


Wednesday March 18, 2020 3:30pm - 4:30pm CDT
Leonard Center Hall of Fame Room

3:30pm CDT

Remodeling Reference Statistics: Beyond Quantitative Data
In this session we will share how we are using an online statistic tracking module to enhance reference transaction information. We will offer library professionals the opportunity to consider how they can use qualitative and quantitative data collection practices to increase internal and external communication, demonstrate how librarians impact student success, allow for better follow through when problems arise, and increase opportunities to analyze our reference transactions for better resource management.

Speakers
CD

Casey Duevel

Reference Coordinator / Reference Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
I love working with students at the reference desk and love the thrill of using reference interview techniques to find the crux of the problem for the student.My non-library related loves are my wonderful husband and daughter, my fluffy critters (1 dog and 1 cats), hoarding recipes... Read More →
MM

Mark McCullough

Reference Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
ER

Evan Rusch

Reference Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
avatar for Jenniy Turner

Jenniy Turner

Instructional Services Librarian / Department Chair, Minnesota State University, Mankato


Wednesday March 18, 2020 3:30pm - 4:30pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

3:30pm CDT

Truth Hurts: Bring Something More Exciting into Your Media Reserves Policy
Maintenance of policies regarding media reserves and loanable electronics can be difficult and sometimes downright daunting! This interactive session will be structured as a workshop to allow for attendees to modify or work on their own policies. I will present a thoroughly curated sample of media reserve policies from other institutions, along with the results of a pilot policy that my library is undergoing. The policy on loanable materials audits use, condition, age, and incorporates an assessment tool when items are turned in. There will be three sections of the session: a presentation, breakout work in small groups to create or modify policies, and a critical engagement section where participants will share their policies and engage in a critical discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Vaughan Hennen

Vaughan Hennen

Digital Design and Access Librarian, Dakota State University


Wednesday March 18, 2020 3:30pm - 4:30pm CDT
Library 250

5:30pm CDT

ARLD Social Hour
The Academic and Research Library Division of the Minnesota Library Association would like to invite all LibTech attendees to join us in some library camaraderie at Salsa a la Salsa. Lots of other food options available at the Midtown Global Market. See you there!

Wednesday March 18, 2020 5:30pm - 9:00pm CDT
Salsa a la Salsa - Midtown Global Market 920 E. Lake Street Minneapolis, MN 55407

7:00pm CDT

Board Game Night
Learn a new Euro-style board game, join a party or word game, or bring your own! Enter a prize drawing to win a game.

Game night shuttle information:
  • Game Night on Wednesday, 3/18 (please confirm shuttle at the Front Desk)
  • Leave DoubleTree by Hilton Roseville for Sheraton Midtown at 6:30 p.m.
  • Leave Sheraton Midtown for DoubleTree by Hilton Roseville at 9:30 p.m.



Wednesday March 18, 2020 7:00pm - 9:30pm CDT
 
Thursday, March 19
 

8:00am CDT

Registration/ Continental Breakfast
Registration table will be in the Atrium on the 2nd floor of the Leonard Center. Continental breakfast will be served in the adjacent Field House.

Thursday March 19, 2020 8:00am - 9:00am CDT
LC - Field House

9:00am CDT

Keynote - Charlotte Roh
Charlotte Roh is the Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University of San Francisco, a Jesuit institution with a strong social justice mission. Her experience includes a career in academic publishing as an editor, an MLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (where she discovered she was allergic to cats), a scholarly communication residency at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and fellowships with Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC). She is currently the vice-chair of the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee, which has published a new research agenda that focuses on making the scholarly communication process more open, equitable, and inclusive.

Speakers
avatar for Charlotte Roh

Charlotte Roh

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of San Francisco


Thursday March 19, 2020 9:00am - 10:15am CDT
LC - Field House

10:30am CDT

ARCHON to ASpace: Adventures in Archives Migration
In August 2018, the University Archives and Southern Minnesota Historical Center at Minnesota State University, Mankato decided to migrate our finding aids and collection information from a hidden ARCHON database to a publicly available ArchivesSpace instance. This time sensitive decision was made with no budget available and in the midst of both a library system migration (Aleph to Alma/Primo) and an entire University website migration that affected us more than we initially thought. Three migrations is no big deal, right? This session will talk about our migration from design to implementation to “Oops! Where did that go?” We will share with you what worked and what didn’t in our path to creating a new searchable archives tool for our patrons.

Speakers
AS

Adam Smith

Minnesota State University, Mankato
avatar for Heidi Southworth

Heidi Southworth

Digital Initiatives Librarian, Minnesota State University-Mankato
I am the Digital Initiatives Librarian at Minnesota State University, Mankato. I am the manager of Cornerstone, our institutional repository (bepress Digital Commons) and I assist in the development of ARCH, our University Archives digital collections platform (Islandora).
avatar for Tom Tran

Tom Tran

Systems Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
DV

Daniel Vang

Minnesota State University, Mankato


Thursday March 19, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Olin-Rice 100

10:30am CDT

Creating an Open Educational Resource, Grenzenlos Deutsch, German Language Open Education Curriculum -- It Takes a Community!
Britt Abel, Co-Project Director of grenzenlos-deutsch.com and Macalester College faculty leads this session about the creation of an open educational resource (OER). Learn about the faculty perspective on why and how to dive into an open curriculum project, including an approach from a diversity and inclusion perspective. The planning process will also be covered: obtaining grant funding, workflow, technical aspects, artwork, and creating audio/visual content.

This multi-institution authored OER has included support from individuals in the Macalester Art and Art History Department, Information Technology Services, and the DeWitt Wallace Library, some of which will be on hand to help answer questions. We honor the memory of Ron Joslin, creator of the LibTech conference, as he was also instrumental in this project.

Speakers
avatar for Louann  Terveer

Louann Terveer

Digital Initiatives & Scholarly Communication Librarian, Macalester College
BA

Britt Abel

Macalester


Thursday March 19, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Olin-Rice 150

10:30am CDT

Learning Sequences for Student Multimedia Technology Projects
As more undergraduate students engage with multimedia technology in their coursework, it has become important to expand technology instruction beyond simply teaching a tool, to fostering a deeper understanding of how these technologies can be used to communicate research and express ideas to different audiences.

Librarians and Instructional Technologists at CSB/SJU have been working together to develop a set of learning sequences that serve as guidelines for incorporating multimedia technology into the classroom in a way that helps students think critically, engage in serious scholarly research, and develop stronger information literacy skill sets. These learning sequences include our recommended steps for instruction and project work, information literacy goals from the ACRL Framework, and best practices and tips based on our experience and assessment of past classes.

In this presentation, we will share our process for developing the learning sequences and provide examples of how they have been used for video, audio/podcast, website, and 3D printing student projects in undergraduate coursework across multiple disciplines. Participants will leave this session having learned about how to create meaningful, information literacy-focused student learning experiences with multimedia projects.

Speakers
KK

Kelly Kraemer

College of St. Benedict / St. John's University
avatar for Adam  Konczewski

Adam Konczewski

Instructional Technology Specialist, College of St. Benedict / St. John\'s Univeristy
As a Instructional Technologist, Adam Konczewski has been working with both students and faculty by implementing and facilitating modern technology into the hands of future generations. His skills with 3D printing, video production, and robotics have served well when guiding classes... Read More →


Thursday March 19, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Olin-Rice 250

10:30am CDT

Leveraging Library Data through a RESTful API to Build a Homegrown Wayfinding and Digital Signage System
As digital signage and wayfinding systems become ubiquitous in libraries, keeping information up-to-date and preventing duplication of work helps save time and money. Vendor platforms often have steep costs, and may not have libraries as their primary audience. Learn how to ingest local data from your Drupal or SQL database environment, as well as how to integrate third party APIs into your platform using the SLIM framework, which makes all your relevant data available in JSON format. Second, we will look at building a flexible, locally developed wayfinding and digital signage interface using open-source frameworks and putting your available data to work. The first iteration of our wayfinding includes Library Hours, Personnel Directory, Events and Weather. Learn about the challenges of in-house development, from the production cycle to the physical installation of the system. We will also explore the advantages of a homegrown system in its flexibility, and ability to extend functionality in a modular workflow.

Speakers
avatar for David Morck

David Morck

Web Programmer, California State University, Northridge
David Morck is a web programmer at the Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge. David is an open access and accessibility advocate, published poet, bass player and cat botherer.Drupal, HTML/CSS/JS, LAMP, SASS, Bootstrap, Marketing / Outreach, Digital Publishing... Read More →
GF

Guillermo Flores

California State University, Northridge


Thursday March 19, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Library Harmon Room

10:30am CDT

LibTech Conference: The Meta Session
After hosting LibTech for 13 years Macalester has decided to take a break next year and has not decided how, or if, the conference will continue. Come learn about what goes into planning and hosting a conference for 500 people at a small liberal arts college on an annual basis. We also will share information about the history of the conference, why we do the things we do at the conference, and reasons why we decided to take a break. There will be an opportunity to share your thoughts on the future of the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Albertson

Aaron Albertson

Librarian, Macalester College
avatar for Beth Hillemann

Beth Hillemann

Research & Instruction Librarian, Macalester College
avatar for Jacki Betsworth

Jacki Betsworth

Library Specialist, Macalester College
I support Macalester's publication and communications projects, including student and professional journals, and am a Library Technology Conference Planning Committee member. Talk to me about publication processes or social media.


Thursday March 19, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Leonard Center Hall of Fame Room

10:30am CDT

Linking to the Future: The Sequel
The University of Minnesota Libraries is one of 17 cohort institutions participating in the Mellon-funded Linked Data for Libraries (LD4P): Pathway to Implementation grant project. At last year's LibTech conference, presenters provided background on the LD4P project, and gave a preview of what the linked data editor might look like. This presentation will provide updates on the project at large, and U of M's participation. It will include a live demonstration of the Sinopia metadata editor, and include information about our efforts to contribute University of Minnesota-affiliated researcher data to Wikidata. We will also include a discussion on what the future of LD4P and linked data might be, as the current phase of the grant project nears its end.

Speakers
avatar for Christine DeZelar-Tiedman

Christine DeZelar-Tiedman

Metadata and Emerging Technologies Librarian, University of Minnesota
In my current position, I am the lead strategist for the University of Minnesota Libraries for Linked Data initiatives. In addition, I provide cataloging and metadata services for Minnesota's Archives and Special Collections, and serve as BIBCO coordinator.
avatar for Kristi Bergland

Kristi Bergland

Music Metadata Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
Kristi Bergland is the Music Metadata Librarian at the University of Minnesota Libraries. She also works with electronic books and streaming media. Other interests include citation management, equity, diversity, and inclusion work, and audio-visual preservation.


Thursday March 19, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
Library 250

10:30am CDT

Wait, I Shouldn’t Use Email!? Well, it Depends.
Library staff use email at work every day to communicate with patrons, stakeholders, and colleagues. In a busy world, it is sometimes an ideal solution to scheduling challenges and especially for “quick” reference questions. But often, email exchanges are an unexpectedly inconvenient, and even sometimes inappropriate, way to handle questions. Sometimes, switching out of email interactions can be a big improvement for both patrons and library staff members.
Both presenters work with legal issues, so a portion of the session will focus on the legal implications of emails related to patron privacy, human resources issues, and other topics that should sometimes not be documented. There are many other situations when email is not ideal - complicated reference questions, topics that may raise sensitive personal issues, and more. Presenters will offer perspectives on identifying times when email may be inefficient or inappropriate, some strategies for managing workflows and patron preferences, and how to use other technologies in place of email. There will also be time for participants to share their own challenges and strategies.

Speakers
EM

Emily McLoughlin

Copyright Permissions Coordinator, University of Minnesota
Emily is the Copyright Permissions Coordinator at the University of Minnesota where she acquires permissions on behalf of faculty and staff to use copyrighted items in their course websites, course packs, Libraries' Reserve, publications and other University-related purposes.
avatar for Nancy Sims

Nancy Sims

Copyright Program Librarian, University of Minnesota
Nancy Sims is lawyerbrarian who is fascinated by copyright issues in modern life. She helps folks understand how copyright may affect their lives, and advocates policies and laws that enable wide public cultural participation.


Thursday March 19, 2020 10:30am - 11:30am CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

11:30am CDT

Lunch
Thursday March 19, 2020 11:30am - 1:00pm CDT
LC - Field House

1:00pm CDT

Automated Storage & Retrieval Systems in Libraries
Please join us for a discussion about the evolving service and usage of an Automated Storage and Retrieval System (AS/RS) in library environments. Almost thirty years ago the first AS/RS was installed and put into production as a convenient on-site storage solution that facilitated quick access to low-use items while creating space for new high-use materials. However, this process was changed after an in-depth analysis. The AS/RS has been repurposed to house new and high usage materials for safety, security, customer service, auditing, etc. In order to meet increased demand, the AS/RS requires ongoing hardware and software support as well as dedicated employees and financial resources. Please join us as we explore storage, space and security, lessons learned, and future strategy of the library's AS/RS.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Kovalcik

Justin Kovalcik

Director of Library IT, California State University, Northridge Oviatt Library
MV

Mike Villalobos

California State University, Northridge Oviatt Library


Thursday March 19, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Library 250

1:00pm CDT

Data Visualization with Tableau
Interested in data visualization but not sure where to start? In this workshop we'll be discussing data visualization software with a focus on Tableau Public. Tableau Public is a free software that can be used to work with CSV files, select the type of chart best suited for the data, and publish visualizations online for sharing via social media. Its ease of use makes it a good tool to work with students and integrate into workshops for working with datasets. Participants will be asked to download Tableau Public prior to the session and provided with sample datasets to experiment with using to create data visualizations to display online.

We will have a limited number of USB keys with the Tableau software uploaded but participants are strongly encouraged to download the program to their laptops in advance of the session. It can be downloaded at: https://public.tableau.com/s/

Speakers
avatar for Heather Rogers

Heather Rogers

Education & Human Development Librarian, University of North Dakota
avatar for Zeineb Yousif

Zeineb Yousif

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of North Dakota


Thursday March 19, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Olin-Rice 100

1:00pm CDT

Harmonizing Practices and Principles: The Preliminary Work of a Privacy Task Force
Protecting user privacy has long been a stated professional value, but how much do library principles and practices really line up? Do librarians within the same institution agree upon what we are doing--and should be doing--to protect user privacy? Our interactive session will share the work of the recently formed Privacy Task Force at the University of Minnesota Libraries and also facilitate conversation around this complex topic. The Privacy Task Force is charged with inventorying how user data is collected, stored, and protected; engaging staff in conversation about user privacy; and making recommendations about library policies and practices. We will share why this group was formed, what we have learned thus far, what we still hope to do, and what some of our challenges have been along the way. We will share themes that surfaced as we inventoried current practices that we believe attendees will find both relatable and thought-provoking. During our session, participants will have the opportunity to consider and discuss illustrative user data privacy scenarios. Our session will be contextualized with insights and perspectives emanating from the broader national conversation currently happening around this issue. By sharing how one large university library is approaching this issue and engaging participants in real-life scenarios, we hope to avoid easy answers and provide space for reflection and lively discussion.

Speakers
MG

Mariya Gyendina

University of Minnesota Libraries
avatar for Danya  Leebaw

Danya Leebaw

Director, Social Sciences & Professional Programs, University of Minnesota
Danya Leebaw is Director, Social Sciences and Professional Programs at the University of Minnesota Libraries. She spent ten years as a social sciences librarian at Carleton College, and prior to that was a business librarian at Emory University. Danya earned her MLIS from the University... Read More →
avatar for Cody  Hanson

Cody Hanson

Director of Web Development, University of Minnesota


Thursday March 19, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Weyerhaeurser Boardroom

1:00pm CDT

How to Make It in Education: Integrating Makerspaces into the Curriculum
Makerspaces offer space and tools for individuals to explore ways of making and to tinker and create for their own enjoyment. However, in educational settings, they can also support academic making activities, where students learn how to use equipment and create items as part of class assignments. There are academic areas, such as art or engineering, that may lend themselves to creative efforts. But how can making and makerspaces be integrated more widely into the curriculum?

This session will discuss how the staff at an academic library approached encouraging faculty to create makerspace-related assignments. With the support of the university center for teaching and learning, the library staff led a multi-disciplinary faculty learning community in examining making assignments and then creating their own and implementing them in their courses. The session will address both the process of creating and assessing the assignments as well as the context and expectations of assigning them to students. Following the implementation and assessment of the assignments, the faculty learning community members then offered guidance to other faculty on how they could approach this work in their own courses.

In addition to their work with the faculty learning community, the presenters will share a wealth of resources drawn from higher education and K-12 makerspace literature and makerspaces on how instructors are including making activities in their courses to meet learning objectives. They will also share how makerspace competencies can be a useful tool for connecting learning outcomes with making activities when creating and assessing assignments.

Speakers
avatar for John Burke

John Burke

Library Director & Principal Librarian, Miami University Middletown
John J. Burke is the author of the Neal-Schuman Library Technology Companion (ALA, 2019) and Makerspaces: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018). His scholarship centers on makerspaces, LMS embedded librarianship, and technology for library staff. John is the... Read More →


Thursday March 19, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Olin-Rice 250

1:00pm CDT

Improving Online Presence with Grid CSS
Learn the basics of CSS Grid (Cascading Style Sheets) technology to help improve online layouts, lists, and the overall UI. Whether you are creating or improving LibGuides or webpages, deploying this fairly new technology is free, it works across major web browsers, and it's responsive across devices. This presentation will provide an introduction to Grid CSS, discuss some of its pros and cons, and will offer some basic code samples that can be adapted for your own library virtual presence.

Optional: Plan to bring a device with a text editor and/or your favorite coding app. as we download and try some simple hands-on CSS Grid examples.

Speakers
avatar for William Straub

William Straub

Virtual Services Librarian, Hamline University, Bush Library


Thursday March 19, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Leonard Center Hall of Fame Room

1:00pm CDT

Innovation on a Shoestring: Free & Cheap Tools
Libraries everywhere are dealing with tight budgets and shrinking staff. Small and medium libraries are particularly hard hit by these issues. So, how are they maintaining a respectable level of technology and library service innovation with little or no money and staff? They are starting new programs, bringing in new resources, and developing new partnerships by harnessing the full potential of new internet tools, technologies, and websites. This session will highlight some very creative responses from small and rural libraries in middle America. Attendees will pick up some great ideas they can take back and use at their own library, no matter what the size, to provide innovative library services and programming.

Speakers
avatar for Christa Porter

Christa Porter

Library Development Director, Nebraska Library Commission
Christa Porter is the Library Development Director at the Nebraska Library Commission. She coordinates the Library Development Team to provide statewide programs and services: Public Library Accreditation, Continuing Education, E-rate training and consultation, Grants to Libraries... Read More →
avatar for Louise Alcorn

Louise Alcorn

Technology Services Coordinator, West Des Moines Public Library
Louise Alcorn is the Technology Services Coordinator at the West Des Moines (Iowa) Public Library. She presents nationally, focusing on easy technology solutions in small- to mid-size public libraries. She has authored two books on library technology topics. Louise participates with... Read More →


Thursday March 19, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

1:00pm CDT

Migrating to an Open-Source ILS in an Academic Library: How to Celebrate Successes and Bounce Back from Problems
Open source integrated library systems are becoming increasingly popular with academic institutions, a trend that is expected to continue as these systems, including Koha and Folio, mature and become widely available. Their popularity is partially attributable to the increasing costs of proprietary systems and the growing availability of affordable third-party support for those libraries that don’t have the staffing or funding to fully support an open source system. For libraries that are considering migrating to an open source product, we present two examples: the University of Montevallo, which moved from Horizon to Koha in 2018, and Colorado College, which moved from Millennium to Koha in 2020. In this session, we will discuss the preparation of data for migration, the design of the OPAC and the patron experience, the implementation of supported Koha, the process of working with staff and faculty on a major migration, and, of course, communication. By describing the ways in which this process differs across public and private institutions, this session will help librarians to understand the process of migration, the many ways in which migrations can go right, and some ideas of what to do when something inevitably goes wrong.

Speakers
avatar for Charissa Brammer

Charissa Brammer

Metadata & Discovery Systems Librarian, Colorado College
CG

Cate Guenther

Colorado College


Thursday March 19, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Library Harmon Room

1:00pm CDT

Reading for Justice: A Database for YA & Youth Literature
The Reading for Justice Database aims to provide librarians and patrons with better access to YA and children’s literature book subjects centered around social justice. This database began as a project in Dr. David McKoskey’s Database Management course at St. Catherine University. The project then continued to develop through an independent study where the goal was to build a website and user interface for the database. The website includes a search page, report page, and an administrative page for editing.

The presentation will cover the initial stages of the database’s development, the challenges of gathering data, preventing a “default” from skewing our data, and the overall process of connecting the database to our user interface. We hope we have created something that librarians and patrons would find useful for identifying books centered around themes of social justice.

Speakers
LB

Laura Bell

St. Catherine University, MLIS Candidate
KR

Katie Retterath

St. Catherine University, MLIS Candidate & Visual Resources Specialist, Macalester College
DD

Dr. David McKoskey

St. Catherine University, Adjunct Professor


Thursday March 19, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm CDT
Olin-Rice 350

2:15pm CDT

Accessibility Training through Pop-up Workshops
Accessibility can be intimidating, but no fear! You don’t have to be an expert to start learning on your own, or spreading awareness in your library. Come learn and discuss digital accessibility best practices for all types of libraries, see how easy it can be to get started, and learn how digital accessibility affects the ways users interact with libraries online. Then see a model of Accessibility Pop-up Workshops for internal training including lesson plans, handouts, and resources on a range of topics including how to create accessible documents. Leave with these tools and adapt them for workshops in your own library, or simply use them as an individual training guide. This informative presentation will intermix formal learning opportunities with small group discussions to share your knowledge and discuss accessibility in your library, all while gaining confidence to start implementing and sharing knowledge of accessibility best practices no matter your position in the library.

Speakers
avatar for Jacqueline Frank

Jacqueline Frank

Research & Instruction Librarian, Montana State University - Bozeman
Obsessive dog owner. Loves dogs, rivers, science, and fresh air. Favorite quote: "Don't blow it - good planets are hard to find" (unknown). Let’s talk about: essentialism, personality types, & our current media addictions!


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Weyerhaeurser Boardroom

2:15pm CDT

App Overload: Integrating Libraries in Rapidly-Increasing Higher Ed App Design and Development (10 minute lightning session)
How many apps has your institution created (or branded)? Which departments or teams designed them? Does your library have a presence in every single one?

A 2017 national survey revealed that twenty-three percent of undergraduate students log onto five or more mobile platforms to access the programs they need to succeed in college. At the University of Missouri, students use many more university-branded platforms to access vital information, services, and resources. Many of these applications were created in relatively siloed departments and launched quickly. Almost all were initially designed (or purchased and customized) without library input.

Hear from a panel of academic librarians about how their organization succeeded in integrating library resources and services into a wide-variety of university-branded applications, and their plans for maintaining a seat at the app design table moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft

Librarian, University of Missouri Libraries
Taira Meadowcroft is an Information Services Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on providing evidence-based information to health practitioners in MU Health Care and assisting with their quality improvement efforts. It is through her work on the University... Read More →
avatar for Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins

Academic Technologist, University of Minnesota
I work on the Technology Enhanced Learning team for LATIS (Liberal Arts Technology & Innovation Services) at the University of Minnesota. As an ed tech consultant for  UMN's First-Year Writing program, my goal is to connect instructors with the tools and resources they need to feel confident... Read More →


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

2:15pm CDT

Choosing Tech
Practical information on how to select technology for your library including worth, placement, and examples for makerspaces and nontraditional circulating collections. A wide range of technology from simple and inexpensive to complex and expensive will be discussed.

Speakers
AR

Ambri Refer

Cedar Falls Public Library


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Olin-Rice 150

2:15pm CDT

Collaborative Practices establishing eXtended Reality (XR) services on campus
Join our discussion facilitated by two librarians and one director of XR lab about the ups and downs, the exactment and trepidations charting the future of XR services on campus.We will share our experience of a librarian from Moorhead and a librarian and director of XR lab from SCSU and our collaboration to overcome the technological and organizational issues surrounding the establishment of a XR service for the entire campus. We will invite you to join and share our experience in skills in very practical and hands-on questions.

Speakers
avatar for Plamen Miltenoff

Plamen Miltenoff

St. Cloud State
MG

Mark Gill

St. Cloud State


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Olin-Rice 100

2:15pm CDT

Exploring with Library Outreach (10 minute lightning session)
Sometimes a spark of creativity and adventurousness can take library outreach to another level. This presentation will exemplify that by briefly covering some of the challenges of library outreach and presenting ways the Macalester College Library has overcome them. With tools like WeVideo, Audacity, iMovie, and LibWizard features, librarians have managed to create fun, low-stakes videos and to incorporate popular crowdsourcing features in resource guides. These efforts have enabled the library to collaborate with non-curricular departments across campus, support campus-wide initiatives, and inform the community of library services. Attendees will gain insight from this experience of using several tools to connect with the community and also consider these tools as an opportunity to provide equitable delivery of library services.

Speakers
MI

Marina Ito

Research & Instruction Librarian, Macalester


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

2:15pm CDT

Lights, Camera, …Action? Opportunities (and Challenges) in Providing a Recording Studio in Your Library
Over the last several years the BYU Library has added recording spaces as services to students. We have a video production studio and two sound booths. I have learned a lot through the process of managing these spaces. Offering recording and production spaces allows a library to help patrons enter the world of content creation. Knowing how to start can present a challenge to many librarians and the answers are different for different types of libraries. This presentation will draw on the experience of the BYU library, but it primarily seeks to help you find answers that will fit your library's needs and constraints.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Nielsen

Ben Nielsen

Multimedia Lab Specialist, Brigham Young University
I manage the multimedia lab of the BYU library. We have an editing lab of iMacs, a sound booth, a production studio, an equipment checkout for audio and video equipment, and a software training program.


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Leonard Center Hall of Fame Room

2:15pm CDT

Raspberry Pi Alternatives to Expensive Tech (10 minute lightning session)
This talk will give a brief overview of two uses of Raspberry Pis in the Colgate University Libraries: as an inexpensive barcode duplicator, and as a gate counter. Source code and instructions for both projects will be available. Strengths and weaknesses of using an RPi for these kinds projects will also be touched upon, with a focus on mitigating potential security issues.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Sandford

Mark Sandford

Systems Librarian, Colgate University


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

2:15pm CDT

Streaming (Not Screaming) Video: Managing Licensing, Student Access, and Faculty Expectations for Streaming Video in Academic Libraries
Streaming video is in high demand in the world from free services like YouTube and subscription services like Netflix and Hulu. Educators want to share feature films and documentaries with their students to enhance understanding of course topics or in situations, such as film studies, where the video itself is the object of study. However, licensing issues and copyright restrictions shape educational uses of video in ways that seem at odds with the access statement of ALA's Core Values of Librarianship. The presenters will examine the issues that academic libraries confront when providing access to streaming videos. What happens when a university revamps its streaming video policies to better align with copyright law? How can librarians educate faculty about legal use of streaming video and the financial limitations faced by both library budgets and students to license needed videos? What options do libraries have for providing students with free access to video content when streaming availability grows, but vendors do not sell institutional licenses for videos to libraries? Learn how to communicate a new, proper outlook on using streaming video and to implement processes for assessing course needs, evaluating fair use and TEACH Act exemptions, and tracking down videos. The presenters will share pitfalls and successes in implementing the recent policy and process changes instituted by the university libraries, and discuss the larger impact of streaming video licensing on future access provided by libraries.

Speakers
KM

Krista McDonald

Director, Miami University Hamilton
avatar for John Burke

John Burke

Library Director & Principal Librarian, Miami University Middletown
John J. Burke is the author of the Neal-Schuman Library Technology Companion (ALA, 2019) and Makerspaces: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018). His scholarship centers on makerspaces, LMS embedded librarianship, and technology for library staff. John is the... Read More →


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Olin-Rice 250

2:15pm CDT

Teaching Them to Fish: Implementing A Tutorial-based Redesign for Special Collections and Archives LibGuides (10 minute lightning session)
In order to better align their online research support presence with evolving in-person and online patron needs, Research Services and Education at the University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center transformed their 150+ legacy LibGuides into just over a dozen targeted tools for finding, requesting, and accessing special collections materials. Once used as a comprehensive means to group special collections catalog records and archives finding aids by subject areas, SCRC’s legacy guides had grown unwieldy to maintain by staff and overwhelming for researcher use. Taking a “consolidate, curate, teach” approach to redesign efforts, Research Services and Education abandoned these exhaustive collection lists and granular subject areas in favor of streamlined tutorials aimed at teaching users how to navigate the various format types, digital collections, and research support services available in SCRC. With additional goals of easing administration behind-the-scenes and creating a consistent visual identity and user experience throughout, SCRC’s new LibGuides provide a case study in producing easy-to-manage, user-focused online research services tools that directly address the needs of internal and external special collections users, that teach rather than simply show.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Weddington

Daniel Weddington

Research Services Archivist, University of Michigan Special Collections Research Center


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

2:15pm CDT

The Taming of the Site: Wrangling Content and Streamlining Information Architecture to Help Users Find What They Need Where They Expect It
Helping users find the need-to-know information on a library website can be difficult, especially if the site’s structure itself confuses them or leads them to unexpected places. But designing content with end users in mind helps us create the content they’re looking for, while user testing to see where content is expected to be helps us lead them in the right direction. Over the past year, the Chester Fritz Library (CFL) at the University of North Dakota has been working on a complete site overhaul from the ground up. The current CFL site started small over eight years ago and grew as new content was requested. A review of the site showed that that content was often incorrect, unnecessary, or duplicated; links were outdated; and site navigation was confusing. Without a doubt, change was necessary! During this presentation, you’ll find out how user testing (via card sort software) helps determine where users expect content to be, allowing site designers to update their entire information architecture (IA) and simplify their navigational structure. You’ll also learn how identifying content owners makes content clean-up easier to finish and simpler to maintain. We’ll walk through steps that anyone can take to make sure their IA informs site navigation in a way that leads users the way they need to go. We’ll also discuss how to identify important content and distill it in a way that helps users get what they need without becoming frustrated. Do you have a legacy site that is confusing your users? Then this session is for you!

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Gilbert Redman

Jessica Gilbert Redman

Online Resources & Services Librarian, UND School of Medicine & Health Sciences Library Resources


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Library Harmon Room

2:15pm CDT

Through a Scanner Darkly: Prison-based Digital Labor and Libraries (10 minute lightning session)
Incarcerated people have a long history of work that provides goods to government agencies--furniture, license plates, workers’ clothing--but in recent years prison industries have expanded into providing services, too. In this talk, you will learn about recent growth of digitization work in American prisons. From newspapers to yearbooks to state records, an increasing proportion of the cultural record is being made available to researchers via the labor of incarcerated workers. We will also examine the ethics of this practice and what practical steps we can take to enact change.

Speakers
avatar for Alexis Logsdon

Alexis Logsdon

Humanities Research & Digital Scholarship Librarian, University of Minnesota


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
JBD Lecture Hall

2:15pm CDT

VR Penn State: Implementing a Virtual Reality Lab in Pattee & Paterno Library
As a result of an increase in 3D and virtual reality technology needs at the University Park campus, The Pennsylvania State University Libraries chose to implement a VR lab in the fall of 2018. In this presentation, we will walk participants through our process of establishing and operating a virtual reality lab within the Pattee and Paterno Library. We’ll discuss the technology and software featured in the lab, how a service model was established and is maintained, how staffing and hours of operation are managed, and how data is collected and used for assessment. All of these steps required collaboration between subject librarians, technology specialists, and staff from across the library system. Since the lab has been open for an entire year, we will review our experiences and recommendations for establishing a new VR service, as well as outline our goals for the next several years. The presentation will include engaging discussion surrounding how libraries can be at the forefront of access to virtual reality technology and what kind of collaboration is required to make a VR program successful.

Speakers
avatar for Claire Salvati

Claire Salvati

Reference & Technology Librarian, Penn State University
avatar for Paul Burnell

Paul Burnell

Search Bar Manager and Emerging Technology Specialist, Penn State University


Thursday March 19, 2020 2:15pm - 3:15pm CDT
Library 250

3:30pm CDT

Reception
Hors d'oeuvres and beverages (alcoholic and non-alcoholic).

Thursday March 19, 2020 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
LC - Field House